Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Har Nof Massacre
Dear friends,
>> Yesterday at about 7am my daughter Miri called. "Mordechai just came home from shul. He said that Arabs came in and are shooting, and that a man with an axe is hitting everyone. Some of the people threw chairs at them, but it didn't help". The twelve year old had hit the floor along with everyone else when the bullets began to fly. He was fully aware of what was going on, and what it meant. He somehow found the courage to let go of his father's hand, crawl towards the exit and break into a run. Some of you know Miri and her family. She has had some of you over for Shabbos and holidays, and others sleeping in one of her kid's bedrooms when the crowd at my house gets too big to accommodate sanely. Mordechai is blonde, freckled, and a soft spoken somewhat introverted and studious boy, much like his father, Shmuli. He is not Huck Finn, and the courage he found at those moments were a gift straight from G-d. By the time he finished telling Miri what happened, sirens from Hatzalah ambulances, police cars, and Magen David could be heard telling her that there were casualties. "Where's Shmuli" was the thought that entered her mind again and again as the seconds which felt like hours began to tick. She called me and said, "Say Tehillim. There is shooting in Bnei Torah". I began to say the ancient prayers, stopped myself and called Rabbi Weidan, and told him what was happening. I then began the Tehillim again, knocked on my neighbor's door and told her to do the same. Chani called and told me to look at the news to see what was really happening. Nothing was reported as yet. Of course not. It was only 7:10.
>> I realized that the whether or not the attack was over, that no one as yet knew whether the murderers escaped. I called again, asking that everything be done to see that no one leaves the campus, and then called Miri. Thank G-d she had the sense to stay indoors and not run to the besieged synagogue. When Mordechai came home, the shooting was still happening. By 7:20 we both realized that if she didn't hear from Shmuli, something was very wrong. The police and other services had no information as yet to give to the public, but a family friend who had seen the terror with his own eyes, said that Shmuli had been taken to Haddassah EIn Karem. When Mordechai let go of his hand, he instinctively ran after the child placing himself in the sight of the terrorists. One of them attacked him with his axe, hitting him on the left side of his head, his back and his arm. Somehow he made it to the door. Josh White, a student of Machon Shlomo was riding down Agassi on his bike. He noticed what he described later as "a lot of confusion" in front of Bnei Torah asked someone what was going on, and surprisingly (for Har Nof) the man answered him in Hebrew! In the midst of what to him was gibberish, he picked up the word Aravim (Arabs) and immediately grasped what was happening. He approached the shul and saw Shmuli who was still aware. The Machon student took of his shirt and stopped the bleeding, a move which may have saved Shmuli's life. The shooting was still happening inside. It was about 7:15! The emergency crew drew back, but because SHmuli was already outside, they evacuated him thus making him the first of the wounded to be taken to Hadassah, another factor in his survival. Before collapsing, he asked where Mordechai was, and when he was told that the boy ran away from the carnage, he said, "Baruch Hashem". Inside, the terrorists were continuing their "work". When they entered they turned to their left, and immediately cut down Rabbi Twerski and Rav Kalman Levine who were standing in the corner. Reb Kalman was the husband of Chaya, formally Markowitz who was a student and later a madrichah at Neve. Her husband was not a regular attendee of Bnei Torah. He would generally daven in the earliest possible minyan so he could get in a couple of hours of learning before beginning his day. Yesterday he had a question about something he had learned and had gone after davening to Bnei Torah to put the question to its erudite rav, Rabbi Rubin. The question will now only be resolved in the Heavenly Acadamy. Rev Avraham Goldberg, the third man to be killed is Breina Goldberg's husband. Many of you know Breina as the warm caring efficient secretary cum mother figure at the front desk in the afternoon. I don't as yet know how her husband, or Reb Kupinski the fourth victim met their deaths. The only thing that I know, is that it was brutal and swift. The first policemen to enter were traffic cops who knew what they were facing, and also knew that they were not wearing protective gear. They entered anyway and together with the forces that came afterwards ended the bloodbath. By 7:30 the murderers were apprehended.
>> Miri, my daughter Guli, and her husband were in Hadassah. Miri's other kids were watched by relatives and friends for the day. Mordechai was urged to speak about what he saw again and again in order to diminish the damage of the trauma he had undergone. The rest of the family flowed in, saying Tehillim and waiting for updates. The hospital social worker, Aviva, who is blessed with the rare gift of being empathic without being overbearing, and the women of Ezer Mitzion (a volunteer organization) kept us well supplied with food, calming conversation and practical advice. We were allowed to see Shmuli who was put under anesthesia. We don't know if he heard us or not, but we were talking to him stressing that Mordechai was fine. In the hours before the surgery was done, we found ourselves with Risa Rotman. Her husband, Chaim Yechiel ben Malka, was also attacked, and the extent of his wounds are very serious. Some of you may know Risa (who if I am not mistaken also is an OBG) and those of you whose husbands learned in Ohr Sameach or who recall Reb Meir Shuster who he helped unstintingly for years, may know him as Howie. The policeman who entered first, passed away. May Hashem avenge his blood.
>> Every day in Eretz Yisrael is a gift and a miracle. I have no pretensions of knowing Hashem's will, but I do know that everything He does is purposeful, and that His compassion that is often hidden from the human eye. Anyone who values human life and reality and the eternal nature of the soul is appalled by the idea of people entering a synagogue and killing people who they never met randomly.
>> Except for CNN. They reported the entire event as an attack on a mosque.
>> Except for BBC. They reported that the Israeli police killed two Palestinians (they meant the murderers). The victims of Israeli brutality presumably were going on a stroll through scenic Har Nof when attacked by the racist troops….
>> Please post the truth to whomever you can reach.
>> Please please continue saying Tehillim for Shmuel Yerucham ben Baila and the other victims. Daven that Hashem give strength to the five new widows and 24 new orphans. Most of all thank Hashem that we are not Them, and treasure Hashem's Torah and His Land.
>> Love always,
>> Tziporah

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Solidiers' names who have been wounded. Please daven for them.

יונתן בן חגית אביגיל -Yonatan Ben Hagit Abigail
רן בן ציפורה Ran Ben Tzipora

גיל בן מיכל  - Gil Ben Michal,
אוהד בן אליס גנון  
Ohad Ben Ellis Ganon,
מרדכי חי בן ברכה יהודית  - Mordechai Hai Ben Bracha Yehudit
ישי דב בן נרי - Yishai Dov Ben Nari
עמוס בן סיגל  - Amos Ben Siegal
אוהד בן רות - Ohad Ben Ruth
בן ציון בן רחל - 
Ben-Zion Ben Rachel
איתי אהרון בן אילנה - Itai Aharon Ben Ilana
משה אלעד בן עיתיאל  - Moshe Elad Ben Etiel
שמעון בן גיטל  יונתן - Jonathan Shimon ben Gitel
יוני בן שרה  - Yona Ben Sarah
אביעד בן סימה  -Aviad Ben Simah
ארז בן שרית  Erez Ben Sarit
דור יצחק בן סוזי   - Dor Yitzchak Ben Susie
רמי בן רמונד  - Rami Ben Ramond
עובדיה בן רויטל  - Ovadia Ben Revital
דניאל מנדס בן מרים  - Daniel Mendez Ben Miriam,
יונתן שמעון בן מסעוד--Jonathan Shimon Ben Masod
מור מרדכי בן שרית  - Mor Mordechai Ben Sarit
נריה בן חוה - Nuria Ben Chava
שקד בן אורה  - Sheked Ben Orah
אליאל בן אריאלה  - Eliyahu Ben Ariellah
אליהו בן חוה  - Eliyahu Ben Chava
ארדבו בן ליאורה  - Arad Ben Lior
ליאל בן אילנית - Liel Ben Ilanit
שוהם בן יפה פלורה  -
Shoham ben Yafa flora
יעקב בן לאפו - Jacob Ben Lapu
מיכל בן פרידה -
Michal Ben Fridah
יואב בן גילה - Yoav Ben Gila

Tuesday, January 7, 2014

Parshas Hamon TODAY TUESDAY Jan 7 is a sgula for Parnasa

פרשת המן – שניים מקרא ואחד תרגום
יהִי רָצוֹן מִלְּפָנֶיךָ יי אֱלֹהֵינוּ וֵאלֹהֵי אֲבוֹתֵינוּ שֶׁתַּזְמִין פַּרְנָסָה לְכָל עַמְּךָ בֵּית יִשְׂרָאֵל וּפַרְנָסָתִי וּפַרְנָסַת
אַנְשֵׁי בֵיתִי בִּכְלָלָם .בְּנַחַת וְלֹא בְּצַעַר בְּכָבוֹד וְלֹא בְּבִזּוּי בְּהֶתֵּר וְלֹא בְּאִסּוּר כְּדֵי שֶׁנּוּכַל לַעֲבוֹד עֲבוֹדָתֶךָ
וְלִלְמוֹד תּוֹרָתֶךָ כְּמוֹ שֶׁזַנְתָּ לַאֲבוֹתֵינוּ מָן בַּמִּדְבָּר בְּאֶרֶץ צִיָּה וַעֲרָבָה

וַיֹּאמֶר יְהוָה אֶל- מֹשֶׁה הִנְנִי מַמְטִיר לָכֶם לֶחֶם מִן- הַשָּׁמָיִם וְיָצָא הָעָם וְלָקְטוּ דְּבַר- יוֹם
בְּיוֹמוֹ לְמַעַן אֲנַסֶּנּוּ הֲיֵלֵךְ בְּתוֹרָתִי אִם- לֹא: וַיֹּאמֶר יְהוָה אֶל- מֹשֶׁה הִנְנִי מַמְטִיר לָכֶם לֶחֶם
מִן- הַשָּׁמָיִם וְיָצָא הָעָם וְלָקְטוּ דְּבַר- יוֹם בְּיוֹמוֹ לְמַעַן אֲנַסֶּנּוּ הֲיֵלֵךְ בְּתוֹרָתִי אִם- לֹא: וַאֲמַר
ייְָ לְמֹשֶׁה הָאֲנָא מַחֵית לְכוֹן לַחְמָא מִן שְׁמַיָּא וְיִפְּקוּן עַמָּא וְיִלְקְטוּן פִּתְגָם יוֹם בְּיוֹמֵיהּ בְּדִיל
דַּאֲנַסֵּינוּן הַיְהָכוּן בְּאוֹרָיְתִי אִם לָא: וְהָיָה בַּיּוֹם הַשִּׁשִּׁי וְהֵכִינוּ אֵת אֲשֶׁר- יָבִיאוּ וְהָיָה מִשְׁנֶה
עַל אֲשֶׁר- יִלְקְטוּ יוֹם יוֹם: וְהָיָה בַּיּוֹם הַשִּׁשִּׁי וְהֵכִינוּ אֵת אֲשֶׁר- יָבִיאוּ וְהָיָה מִשְׁנֶה עַל
אֲשֶׁר- יִלְקְטוּ יוֹם יוֹם: וִיהֵי בְּיוֹמָא שְׁתִיתָאָה וִיתַקְּנוּן יָת דְּיַיְתוֹן וִיהֵי עַל חַד תְּרֵין עַל
דְּיִלְקְטוּן יוֹם יוֹם: וַיֹּאמֶר מֹשֶׁה וְאַהֲרֹן אֶל- כָּל- בְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל עֶרֶב- - וִידַעְתֶּם כִּי יְהוָה הוֹצִיא
אֶתְכֶם מֵאֶרֶץ מִצְרָיִם: וַיֹּאמֶר מֹשֶׁה וְאַהֲרֹן אֶל- כָּל- בְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל עֶרֶב- - וִידַעְתֶּם כִּי יְהוָה
הוֹצִיא אֶתְכֶם מֵאֶרֶץ מִצְרָיִם: וַאֲמַר מֹשֶׁה וְאַהֲרוֹן לְכָל בְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל בְּרַמְשָׁא- - וְתִדְּעוּן אֲרֵי ייְָ
אַפֵּיק יָתְכוֹן מֵאַרְעָא דְּמִצְרָיִם: וּבֹקֶר וּרְאִיתֶם אֶת- כְּבוֹד יְהוָה בְּשָׁמְעוֹ אֶת- תְּלֻנֹּתֵיכֶם עַל-
יְהוָה וְנַחְנוּ מָה כִּי תלונו (תַלִּינוּ) עָלֵינוּ: וּבֹקֶר וּרְאִיתֶם אֶת- כְּבוֹד יְהוָה בְּשָׁמְעוֹ אֶת-
תְּלֻנֹּתֵיכֶם עַל- יְהוָה וְנַחְנוּ מָה כִּי תלונו (תַלִּינוּ) עָלֵינוּ: וּבְצַפְרָא וְתִחְזוֹן יָת יְקָרָא דַּייָ
בְּדִשְׁמִיעָן קֳדָמוֹהִי תֻּרְעֲמָתְכוֹן עַל ייְָ וְנַחְנָא מָא אֲרֵי מִתְרָעֲמִתּוּן עֲלַנָא: וַיֹּאמֶר מֹשֶׁה בְּתֵת
יְהוָה לָכֶם בָּעֶרֶב בָּשָׂר לֶאֱכֹל וְלֶחֶם בַּבֹּקֶר לִשְׂבֹּעַ בִּשְׁמֹעַ יְהוָה אֶת- תְּלֻנֹּתֵיכֶם אֲשֶׁר- אַתֶּם
מַלִּינִם עָלָיו וְנַחְנוּ מָה לֹא- עָלֵינוּ תְלֻנֹּתֵיכֶם כִּי עַל- יְהוָה: וַיֹּאמֶר מֹשֶׁה בְּתֵת יְהוָה לָכֶם
בָּעֶרֶב בָּשָׂר לֶאֱכֹל וְלֶחֶם בַּבֹּקֶר לִשְׂבֹּעַ בִּשְׁמֹעַ יְהוָה אֶת- תְּלֻנֹּתֵיכֶם אֲשֶׁר- אַתֶּם מַלִּינִם עָלָיו
וְנַחְנוּ מָה לֹא- עָלֵינוּ תְלֻנֹּתֵיכֶם כִּי עַל- יְהוָה: וַאֲמַר מֹשֶׁה בִּדְיִתֵּין ייְָ לְכוֹן בְּרַמְשָׁא בִּסְרָא
לְמֵיכַל וְלַחְמָא בְּצַפְרָא לְמִסְבַּע בְּדִשְׁמִיעָן קֳדָם ייְָ תֻּרְעֲמָתְכוֹן דְּאַתּוּן מִתְרָעֲמִין עֲלוֹהִי וְנַחְנָא
מָא לָא עֲלַנָא תֻּרְעֲמָתְכוֹן אֱלָהֵין עַל מֵימְרָא דַּייָ: וַיֹּאמֶר מֹשֶׁה אֶל- אַהֲרֹן אֱמֹר אֶל- כָּל- עֲדַת
בְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל קִרְבוּ לִפְנֵי יְהוָה כִּי שָׁמַע אֵת תְּלֻנֹּתֵיכֶם: וַיֹּאמֶר מֹשֶׁה אֶל- אַהֲרֹן אֱמֹר אֶל-
כָּל- עֲדַת בְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל קִרְבוּ לִפְנֵי יְהוָה כִּי שָׁמַע אֵת תְּלֻנֹּתֵיכֶם: וַאֲמַר מֹשֶׁה לְאַהֲרוֹן אֵימַר
לְכָל כְּנִשְׁתָּא דִּבְנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל קְרוּבוּ קֳדָם ייְָ אֲרֵי שְׁמִיעָן קֳדָמוֹהִי תֻּרְעֲמָתְכוֹן: וַיְהִי כְּדַבֵּר אַהֲרֹן
אֶל- כָּל- עֲדַת בְּנֵי- יִשְׂרָאֵל וַיִּפְנוּ אֶל- הַמִּדְבָּר וְהִנֵּה כְּבוֹד יְהוָה נִרְאָה בֶּעָנָן: וַיְהִי כְּדַבֵּר אַהֲרֹן
אֶל- כָּל- עֲדַת בְּנֵי- יִשְׂרָאֵל וַיִּפְנוּ אֶל- הַמִּדְבָּר וְהִנֵּה כְּבוֹד יְהוָה נִרְאָה בֶּעָנָן: וַהֲוָה כַּד מַלֵּיל
אַהֲרוֹן עִם כָּל כְּנִשְׁתָּא דִּבְנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל וְאִתְפְּנִיאוּ לְמַדְבְּרָא וְהָא יְקָרָא דַּייָ אִתְגְּלִי בַּעֲנָנָא:
וַיְדַבֵּר יְהוָה אֶל- מֹשֶׁה לֵּאמֹר: וַיְדַבֵּר יְהוָה אֶל- מֹשֶׁה לֵּאמֹר: וּמַלֵּיל ייְָ עִם מֹשֶׁה לְמֵימַר:
שָׁמַעְתִּי אֶת- תְּלוּנֹּת בְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל- - דַּבֵּר אֲלֵהֶם לֵאמֹר בֵּין הָעַרְבַּיִם תֹּאכְלוּ בָשָׂר וּבַבֹּקֶר
תִּשְׂבְּעוּ- לָחֶם וִידַעְתֶּם כִּי אֲנִי יְהוָה אֱלֹהֵיכֶם: שָׁמַעְתִּי אֶת- תְּלוּנֹּת בְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל- - דַּבֵּר
אֲלֵהֶם לֵאמֹר בֵּין הָעַרְבַּיִם תֹּאכְלוּ בָשָׂר וּבַבֹּקֶר תִּשְׂבְּעוּ- לָחֶם וִידַעְתֶּם כִּי אֲנִי יְהוָה
אֱלֹהֵיכֶם: שְׁמִיעַ קֳדָמַי יָת תֻּרְעֲמָת בְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל- - מַלֵּיל עִמְּהוֹן לְמֵימַר בֵּין שִׁמְשַׁיָּא תֵּיכְלוּן
בִּסְרָא וּבְצַפְרָא תִּסְבְּעוּן לַחְמָא וְתִדְּעוּן אֲרֵי אֲנָא ייְָ אֱלָהֲכוֹן: וַיְהִי בָעֶרֶב- - וַתַּעַל הַשְּׂלָו
וַתְּכַס אֶת- הַמַּחֲנֶה וּבַבֹּקֶר הָיְתָה שִׁכְבַת הַטַּל סָבִיב לַמַּחֲנֶה: וַיְהִי בָעֶרֶב- - וַתַּעַל הַשְּׂלָו
וַתְּכַס אֶת- הַמַּחֲנֶה וּבַבֹּקֶר הָיְתָה שִׁכְבַת הַטַּל סָבִיב לַמַּחֲנֶה: וַהֲוָה בְּרַמְשָׁא- - וּסְלֵיקַת שְׂלָיו
וַחֲפָת יָת מַשְׁרִיתָא וּבְצַפְרָא הֲוָת נָחֲתַת טַלָּא סְחוֹר סְחוֹר לְמַשְׁרִיתָא: וַתַּעַל שִׁכְבַת הַטָּל
וְהִנֵּה עַל- פְּנֵי הַמִּדְבָּר דַּק מְחֻסְפָּס- - דַּק כַּכְּפֹר עַל- הָאָרֶץ: וַתַּעַל שִׁכְבַת הַטָּל וְהִנֵּה עַל- פְּנֵי
הַמִּדְבָּר דַּק מְחֻסְפָּס- - דַּק כַּכְּפֹר עַל- הָאָרֶץ: וּסְלֵיקַת נָחֲתַת טַלָּא וְהָא עַל אַפֵּי מַדְבְּרָא
דַּעְדַּק מְקֻלַּף- - דַּעְדַּק דְּגִיר כִּגְלִידָא עַל אַרְעָא: וַיִּרְאוּ בְנֵי- יִשְׂרָאֵל וַיֹּאמְרוּ אִישׁ אֶל- אָחִיו מָן
הוּא- - כִּי לֹא יָדְעוּ מַה- הוּא וַיֹּאמֶר מֹשֶׁה אֲלֵהֶם הוּא הַלֶּחֶם אֲשֶׁר נָתַן יְהוָה לָכֶם לְאָכְלָה:
וַיִּרְאוּ בְנֵי- יִשְׂרָאֵל וַיֹּאמְרוּ אִישׁ אֶל- אָחִיו מָן הוּא- - כִּי לֹא יָדְעוּ מַה- הוּא וַיֹּאמֶר מֹשֶׁה
אֲלֵהֶם הוּא הַלֶּחֶם אֲשֶׁר נָתַן יְהוָה לָכֶם לְאָכְלָה: וַחֲזוֹ בְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל וַאֲמַרוּ גְּבַר לְאַחוּהִי מַנָּא
הוּא- - אֲרֵי לָא יָדְעִין מָא הוּא וַאֲמַר מֹשֶׁה לְהוֹן הוּא לַחְמָא דִּיהַב ייְָ לְכוֹן לְמֵיכַל: זֶה הַדָּבָר
אֲשֶׁר צִוָּה יְהוָה לִקְטוּ מִמֶּנּוּ אִישׁ לְפִי אָכְלוֹ עֹמֶר לַגֻּלְגֹּלֶת מִסְפַּר נַפְשֹׁתֵיכֶם- - אִישׁ לַאֲשֶׁר
בְּאָהֳלוֹ תִּקָּחוּ: זֶה הַדָּבָר אֲשֶׁר צִוָּה יְהוָה לִקְטוּ מִמֶּנּוּ אִישׁ לְפִי אָכְלוֹ עֹמֶר לַגֻּלְגֹּלֶת מִסְפַּר
נַפְשֹׁתֵיכֶם- - אִישׁ לַאֲשֶׁר בְּאָהֳלוֹ תִּקָּחוּ: דֵּין פִּתְגָמָא דְּפַקֵּיד ייְָ לְקוּטוּ מִנֵּיהּ גְּבַר לְפֹם
מֵיכְלֵיהּ: עֻמְרָא לְגֻלְגֻּלְתָּא מִנְיַן נַפְשָׁתְכוֹן- - גְּבַר לְדִבְמַשְׁכְּנֵיהּ תִּסְּבוּן: וַיַּעֲשׂוּ- כֵן בְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל
וַיִּלְקְטוּ הַמַּרְבֶּה וְהַמַּמְעִיט: וַיַּעֲשׂוּ- כֵן בְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל וַיִּלְקְטוּ הַמַּרְבֶּה וְהַמַּמְעִיט: וַעֲבַדוּ כֵּין
בְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל וּלְקַטוּ דְּאַסְגִּי וּדְאַזְעַר: וַיָּמֹדּוּ בָעֹמֶר- - וְלֹא הֶעְדִּיף הַמַּרְבֶּה וְהַמַּמְעִיט לֹא
הֶחְסִיר אִישׁ לְפִי- אָכְלוֹ לָקָטוּ: וַיָּמֹדּוּ בָעֹמֶר- - וְלֹא הֶעְדִּיף הַמַּרְבֶּה וְהַמַּמְעִיט לֹא הֶחְסִיר
אִישׁ לְפִי- אָכְלוֹ לָקָטוּ: וְכָלוּ בְּעֻמְרָא- - וְלָא אוֹתַר דְּאַסְגִּי וּדְאַזְעַר לָא חֲסַר גְּבַר לְפֹם מֵיכְלֵיהּ
לְקַטוּ: וַיֹּאמֶר מֹשֶׁה אֲלֵהֶם אִישׁ אַל- יוֹתֵר מִמֶּנּוּ עַד- בֹּקֶר: וַיֹּאמֶר מֹשֶׁה אֲלֵהֶם אִישׁ אַל-
יוֹתֵר מִמֶּנּוּ עַד- בֹּקֶר: וַאֲמַר מֹשֶׁה לְהוֹן אֲנָשׁ לָא יַשְׁאַר מִנֵּיהּ עַד צַפְרָא: וְלֹא- שָׁמְעוּ אֶל-
מֹשֶׁה וַיּוֹתִרוּ אֲנָשִׁים מִמֶּנּוּ עַד- בֹּקֶר וַיָּרֻם תּוֹלָעִים וַיִּבְאַשׁ וַיִּקְצֹף עֲלֵהֶם מֹשֶׁה: וְלֹא- שָׁמְעוּ
אֶל- מֹשֶׁה וַיּוֹתִרוּ אֲנָשִׁים מִמֶּנּוּ עַד- בֹּקֶר וַיָּרֻם תּוֹלָעִים וַיִּבְאַשׁ וַיִּקְצֹף עֲלֵהֶם מֹשֶׁה: וְלָא
קַבִּילוּ מִן מֹשֶׁה וְאַשְׁאַרוּ גֻּבְרַיָּא מִנֵּיהּ עַד צַפְרָא וּרְחֵישׁ רִחְשָׁא וּסְרִי וּרְגֵיז עֲלֵיהוֹן מֹשֶׁה:
וַיִּלְקְטוּ אֹתוֹ בַּבֹּקֶר בַּבֹּקֶר אִישׁ כְּפִי אָכְלוֹ וְחַם הַשֶּׁמֶשׁ וְנָמָס: וַיִּלְקְטוּ אֹתוֹ בַּבֹּקֶר בַּבֹּקֶר
אִישׁ כְּפִי אָכְלוֹ וְחַם הַשֶּׁמֶשׁ וְנָמָס: וּלְקַטוּ יָתֵיהּ בִּצְפַר בִּצְפַר גְּבַר כְּפֹם מֵיכְלֵיהּ וּמָא
דְּמִשְׁתְּאַר מִנֵּיהּ עַל אַפֵּי חַקְלָא כַּד חֲמָא עֲלוֹהִי שִׁמְשָׁא פָּשַׁר: וַיְהִי בַּיּוֹם הַשִּׁשִּׁי לָקְטוּ לֶחֶם
מִשְׁנֶה- - שְׁנֵי הָעֹמֶר לָאֶחָד וַיָּבֹאוּ כָּל- נְשִׂיאֵי הָעֵדָה וַיַּגִּידוּ לְמֹשֶׁה: וַיְהִי בַּיּוֹם הַשִּׁשִּׁי לָקְטוּ
לֶחֶם מִשְׁנֶה- - שְׁנֵי הָעֹמֶר לָאֶחָד וַיָּבֹאוּ כָּל- נְשִׂיאֵי הָעֵדָה וַיַּגִּידוּ לְמֹשֶׁה: וַהֲוָה בְּיוֹמָא
שְׁתִיתָאָה לְקַטוּ לַחְמָא עַל חַד תְּרֵין- - תְּרֵין עֻמְרִין לְחַד וַאֲתוֹ כָּל רַבְרְבֵי כְּנִשְׁתָּא וְחַוִּיאוּ
לְמֹשֶׁה: וַיֹּאמֶר אֲלֵהֶם הוּא אֲשֶׁר דִּבֶּר יְהוָה- - שַׁבָּתוֹן שַׁבַּת- קֹדֶשׁ לַיהוָה מָחָר אֵת אֲשֶׁר-
תֹּאפוּ אֵפוּ וְאֵת אֲשֶׁר- תְּבַשְּׁלוּ בַּשֵּׁלוּ וְאֵת כָּל- הָעֹדֵף הַנִּיחוּ לָכֶם לְמִשְׁמֶרֶת עַד- הַבֹּקֶר:
וַיֹּאמֶר אֲלֵהֶם הוּא אֲשֶׁר דִּבֶּר יְהוָה- - שַׁבָּתוֹן שַׁבַּת- קֹדֶשׁ לַיהוָה מָחָר אֵת אֲשֶׁר- תֹּאפוּ אֵפוּ
וְאֵת אֲשֶׁר- תְּבַשְּׁלוּ בַּשֵּׁלוּ וְאֵת כָּל- הָעֹדֵף הַנִּיחוּ לָכֶם לְמִשְׁמֶרֶת עַד- הַבֹּקֶר: וַאֲמַר לְהוֹן הוּא
דְּמַלֵּיל ייְָ- - שַׁבָּא שַׁבָּתָא קֻדְשָׁא קֳדָם ייְָ מְחַר יָת דְּאַתּוּן עֲתִידִין לְמֵיפָא אֵיפוֹ וְיָת דְּאַתּוּן
עֲתִידִין לְבַשָּׁלָא בַּשִּׁילוּ וְיָת כָּל מוֹתָרָא אַצְנַעוּ לְכוֹן לְמַטְּרָא עַד צַפְרָא: וַיַּנִּיחוּ אֹתוֹ עַד-
הַבֹּקֶר כַּאֲשֶׁר צִוָּה מֹשֶׁה וְלֹא הִבְאִישׁ וְרִמָּה לֹא- הָיְתָה בּוֹ: וַיַּנִּיחוּ אֹתוֹ עַד- הַבֹּקֶר כַּאֲשֶׁר
צִוָּה מֹשֶׁה וְלֹא הִבְאִישׁ וְרִמָּה לֹא- הָיְתָה בּוֹ: וְאַצְנַעוּ יָתֵיהּ עַד צַפְרָא כְּמָא דְּפַקֵּיד מֹשֶׁה וְלָא
סְרִי וְרִחְשָׁא לָא הֲוָת בֵּיהּ: וַיֹּאמֶר מֹשֶׁה אִכְלֻהוּ הַיּוֹם כִּי- שַׁבָּת הַיּוֹם לַיהוָה הַיּוֹם לֹא
תִמְצָאֻהוּ בַּשָּׂדֶה: וַיֹּאמֶר מֹשֶׁה אִכְלֻהוּ הַיּוֹם כִּי- שַׁבָּת הַיּוֹם לַיהוָה הַיּוֹם לֹא תִמְצָאֻהוּ
בַּשָּׂדֶה: וַאֲמַר מֹשֶׁה אִכְלוּהִי יוֹמָא דֵּין אֲרֵי שַׁבְּתָא יוֹמָא דֵּין קֳדָם ייְָ יוֹמָא דֵּין לָא
תַּשְׁכְּחוּנֵּיהּ בְּחַקְלָא: שֵׁשֶׁת יָמִים תִּלְקְטֻהוּ וּבַיּוֹם הַשְּׁבִיעִי שַׁבָּת לֹא יִהְיֶה- בּוֹ: שֵׁשֶׁת יָמִים
תִּלְקְטֻהוּ וּבַיּוֹם הַשְּׁבִיעִי שַׁבָּת לֹא יִהְיֶה- בּוֹ: שִׁתָּא יוֹמִין תִּלְקְטוּנֵּיהּ וּבְיוֹמָא שְׁבִיעָאָה
שַׁבְּתָא לָא יְהֵי בֵּיהּ: וַיְהִי בַּיּוֹם הַשְּׁבִיעִי יָצְאוּ מִן- הָעָם לִלְקֹט וְלֹא מָצָאוּ: וַיְהִי בַּיּוֹם
הַשְּׁבִיעִי יָצְאוּ מִן- הָעָם לִלְקֹט וְלֹא מָצָאוּ: וַהֲוָה בְּיוֹמָא שְׁבִיעָאָה נְפַקוּ מִן עַמָּא לְמִלְקַט וְלָא
אַשְׁכַּחוּ: וַיֹּאמֶר יְהוָה אֶל- מֹשֶׁה עַד- אָנָה מֵאַנְתֶּם לִשְׁמֹר מִצְוֹתַי וְתוֹרֹתָי: וַיֹּאמֶר יְהוָה
אֶל- מֹשֶׁה עַד- אָנָה מֵאַנְתֶּם לִשְׁמֹר מִצְוֹתַי וְתוֹרֹתָי: וַאֲמַר ייְָ לְמֹשֶׁה עַד אִמַּתִּי אַתּוּן
מְסָרְבִין לְמִטַּר פִּקּוֹדַי וְאוֹרָיְתָי: רְאוּ כִּי- יְהוָה נָתַן לָכֶם הַשַּׁבָּת- - עַל- כֵּן הוּא נֹתֵן לָכֶם בַּיּוֹם
הַשִּׁשִּׁי לֶחֶם יוֹמָיִם שְׁבוּ אִישׁ תַּחְתָּיו אַל- יֵצֵא אִישׁ מִמְּקֹמוֹ- - בַּיּוֹם הַשְּׁבִיעִי: רְאוּ כִּי- יְהוָה
נָתַן לָכֶם הַשַּׁבָּת- - עַל- כֵּן הוּא נֹתֵן לָכֶם בַּיּוֹם הַשִּׁשִּׁי לֶחֶם יוֹמָיִם שְׁבוּ אִישׁ תַּחְתָּיו אַל- יֵצֵא
אִישׁ מִמְּקֹמוֹ- - בַּיּוֹם הַשְּׁבִיעִי: חֲזוֹ אֲרֵי ייְָ יְהַב לְכוֹן שַׁבְּתָא- - עַל כֵּין הוּא יָהֵיב לְכוֹן בְּיוֹמָא
שְׁתִיתָאָה לְחֵים תְּרֵין יוֹמִין תִּיבוּ אֲנָשׁ תְּחוֹתוֹהִי לָא יִפּוֹק אֲנָשׁ מֵאַתְרֵיהּ- - בְּיוֹמָא שְׁבִיעָאָה:
וַיִּשְׁבְּתוּ הָעָם בַּיּוֹם הַשְּׁבִעִי: וַיִּשְׁבְּתוּ הָעָם בַּיּוֹם הַשְּׁבִעִי: וּשְׁבַתוּ עַמָּא בְּיוֹמָא שְׁבִיעָאָה:
וַיִּקְרְאוּ בֵית- יִשְׂרָאֵל אֶת- שְׁמוֹ מָן וְהוּא כְּזֶרַע גַּד לָבָן וְטַעְמוֹ כְּצַפִּיחִת בִּדְבָשׁ: וַיִּקְרְאוּ בֵית-
יִשְׂרָאֵל אֶת- שְׁמוֹ מָן וְהוּא כְּזֶרַע גַּד לָבָן וְטַעְמוֹ כְּצַפִּיחִת בִּדְבָשׁ: וּקְרוֹ בֵּית יִשְׂרָאֵל יָת שְׁמֵיהּ
מַנָּא וְהוּא כְּבַר זְרַע גִּדָּא חִיוָר וְטַעְמֵיהּ כְּאִסְקְרִיטָוָן בִּדְבַשׁ: וַיֹּאמֶר מֹשֶׁה זֶה הַדָּבָר אֲשֶׁר
צִוָּה יְהוָה- - מְלֹא הָעֹמֶר מִמֶּנּוּ לְמִשְׁמֶרֶת לְדֹרֹתֵיכֶם לְמַעַן יִרְאוּ אֶת- הַלֶּחֶם אֲשֶׁר הֶאֱכַלְתִּי
אֶתְכֶם בַּמִּדְבָּר בְּהוֹצִיאִי אֶתְכֶם מֵאֶרֶץ מִצְרָיִם: וַיֹּאמֶר מֹשֶׁה זֶה הַדָּבָר אֲשֶׁר צִוָּה יְהוָה- -
מְלֹא הָעֹמֶר מִמֶּנּוּ לְמִשְׁמֶרֶת לְדֹרֹתֵיכֶם לְמַעַן יִרְאוּ אֶת- הַלֶּחֶם אֲשֶׁר הֶאֱכַלְתִּי אֶתְכֶם
בַּמִּדְבָּר בְּהוֹצִיאִי אֶתְכֶם מֵאֶרֶץ מִצְרָיִם: וַאֲמַר מֹשֶׁה דֵּין פִּתְגָמָא דְּפַקֵּיד ייְָ- - מְלֵי עֻמְרָא
מִנֵּיהּ לְמַטְּרָא לְדָרֵיכוֹן בְּדִיל דְּיִחְזוֹן יָת לַחְמָא דְּאוֹכֵילִית יָתְכוֹן בְּמַדְבְּרָא בְּאַפָּקוּתִי יָתְכוֹן
מֵאַרְעָא דְּמִצְרָיִם: וַיֹּאמֶר מֹשֶׁה אֶל- אַהֲרֹן קַח צִנְצֶנֶת אַחַת וְתֶן- שָׁמָּה מְלֹא- הָעֹמֶר מָן
וְהַנַּח אֹתוֹ לִפְנֵי יְהוָה לְמִשְׁמֶרֶת לְדֹרֹתֵיכֶם: וַיֹּאמֶר מֹשֶׁה אֶל- אַהֲרֹן קַח צִנְצֶנֶת אַחַת וְתֶן-
שָׁמָּה מְלֹא- הָעֹמֶר מָן וְהַנַּח אֹתוֹ לִפְנֵי יְהוָה לְמִשְׁמֶרֶת לְדֹרֹתֵיכֶם: וַאֲמַר מֹשֶׁה לְאַהֲרוֹן סַב
צְלוֹחִית חֲדָא וְהַב תַּמָּן מְלֵי עֻמְרָא מַנָּא וְאַצְנַע יָתֵיהּ קֳדָם ייְָ לְמַטְּרָא לְדָרֵיכוֹן: כַּאֲשֶׁר צִוָּה
יְהוָה אֶל- מֹשֶׁה וַיַּנִּיחֵהוּ אַהֲרֹן לִפְנֵי הָעֵדֻת לְמִשְׁמָרֶת: כַּאֲשֶׁר צִוָּה יְהוָה אֶל- מֹשֶׁה וַיַּנִּיחֵהוּ
אַהֲרֹן לִפְנֵי הָעֵדֻת לְמִשְׁמָרֶת: כְּמָא דְּפַקֵּיד ייְָ לְמֹשֶׁה וְאַצְנְעֵיהּ אַהֲרוֹן קֳדָם סָהֲדוּתָא
לְמַטְּרָא: וּבְנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל אָכְלוּ אֶת- הַמָּן אַרְבָּעִים שָׁנָה- - עַד- בֹּאָם אֶל- אֶרֶץ נוֹשָׁבֶת: אֶת- הַמָּן
אָכְלוּ- - עַד- בֹּאָם אֶל- קְצֵה אֶרֶץ כְּנָעַן: וּבְנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל אָכְלוּ אֶת- הַמָּן אַרְבָּעִים שָׁנָה- - עַד-
בֹּאָם אֶל- אֶרֶץ נוֹשָׁבֶת: אֶת- הַמָּן אָכְלוּ- - עַד- בֹּאָם אֶל- קְצֵה אֶרֶץ כְּנָעַן: וּבְנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל אֲכַלוּ
יָת מַנָּא אַרְבְּעִין שְׁנִין- - עַד דְּעָאלוּ לַאֲרַע יָתֵיבְתָּא יָת מַנָּא אֲכַלוּ- - עַד דַּאֲתוֹ לִסְיָפֵי אַרְעָא
דִּכְנָעַן: וְהָעֹמֶר עֲשִׂרִית הָאֵיפָה הוּא: וְהָעֹמֶר עֲשִׂרִית הָאֵיפָה הוּא: וְעֻמְרָא חַד מִן עַסְרָא
בִּתְלָת סְאִין הוּא:
אַתָּה הוּא יְי לְבַדֶּךָ אַתָּה עָשִׂיתָ אֶת הַשָּׁמַיִם וּשְׁמֵי הַשָּׁמַים הָאָרֶץ וְכָל אֲשֶׁר עָלֶיהָ הַיַּמִים וְכָל
אֲשֶׁר בָּהֶם וְאַתָּה מְחַיֶּה אֶת כֻּלָּם וְאַתָּה הוּא שֶׁעָשִׂיתָ נִסִּים וְנִפְלָאוֹת גְּדוֹלוֹת תָּמִיד עִם אֲבוֹתֵינוּ
גַּם בַּמִּדְבָּר הִמְטַרְתָּ לָהֶם לֶחֶם מִן הַשָּׁמַיִם וּמִצּוּר הַחַלָּמִישׁ הוצֵאתָ לָהֶם מַיִם וְגַם נָתַתָּ לָהֶם כָּל
צָרְכֵיהֶם שִׂמְלוֹתָם לֹא בָלְתָה מֵעֲלֵיהֶם כֵּן בְּרַחֲמֶיךָ הָרַבִּים וּבַחֲסָדֶיךָ הָעֲצוּמִים תְּזוּנֵנוּ וּתְפַרְנְסֵנוּ
וּתְכַלְכְּלֵנוּ וְתַסְפִּיק לָנוּ כָּל צָרְכֵנוּ וְצָרְכֵי עַמְּךָ בֵּית יִשְׂרָאֵל הַמְרוּבִּים בְּמִלּוּי וּבְרֶוַח בְּלִי טֹרַח וְעָמָל
גָּדוֹל מִתַּחַת יָדְךָ הַנְּקִיָּה וְלֹא מִתַּחַת יְדֵי בָשָׂר וָדָם:
יְהִי רָצוֹן מִלְּפָנֶיךָ יְי אֱלֹהַי וֵאלֹהֵי אֲבוֹתַי שֶׁתָּכִין לִי וּלְאַנְשֵׁי בֵיתִי כָּל מַחֲסוֹרֵנוּ וְתַזְמִין לָנו כָּל
צָרְכֵנוּ לְכָל יוֹם וָיּוֹם מֵחַיֵּינוּ דֵי מַחֲסוֹרֵנוּ וּלְכָל שָׁעָה וְשָׁעָה מִשָּׁעוֹתֵינוּ דֵי סִפּוּקֵנוּ וּלְכָל עֶצֶם
מֵעֲצָמֵינוּ דֵי מִחְיָתֵנוּ מִיָּדְךָ הַטוֹבָה וְהָרְחָבָה וְלֹא כְּמִעוּט מִפְעָלֵינוּ וְקוֹצֶר חֲסָדֵינוּ וּמִזְעֵיר
גְּמוּלוֹתֵינוּ וְיִהְיוּ מְזוֹנוֹתַי וּמְזוֹנוֹת אַנְשֵׁי בֵיתִי וְזַרְעִי וְזֶרַע זַרְעִי מְסוּרִים בְּיָדְךָ וְלֹא בְּיַד בָּשָׂר וָדָם:
לע"נ הרה"ח ר' אברהם ז"ל בן יבלחט"א הרה"ח ר' משה ארי' וייזנער הי"ו
מנכ"ל מפעל הש"ס העולמי

Sunday, December 22, 2013

Modern Highways as Reminders of Our AncientPast©


Whenever I travel on highways in Eretz Yisrael, I imagine how difficult it must have been for people to travel without the convenience of modern transportation on modern roads. It must have been really hard bumping along on a camel or donkey (like Eliezer eved Avraham, in Parashas Chayei Sarah) over rough, rocky terrain. Twenty miles a day was the average distance they could travel. This makes us appreciate the ease and speed of our modern cars and buses (with air-conditioning) that carry us over this ancient land. Much praise and thanksgiving should be given to the One Above for this great kindness to our generation.

Israel now has a modern highway network with well-maintained roads. In recent years, increased investment in infrastructure has greatly improved the condition of roads in the country. In fact, the roads and highways of Eretz Yisrael are among the best in the world and are constantly being upgraded.

I heard from Rav Sholom Meir Hacohen Walach, in the name of Harav Yehoshua Leib Diskin, that there is a midrash which says that before the coming of Moshiach, the roads of Eretz Yisrael will be restored. Seeing the great activity in road construction of the last few years in Eretz Yisrael, we can be assured that the Great Day for which we are all awaiting — the Day of the Geulah— is very close at hand.

Recently, many of the distances from one place to another in Eretz Yisrael have been shortened with the construction of new roads. Tunnels burrow though mountains, and bridges are built over wadis. These shortcuts save many hours of traveling time.

It used to take three-quarters of an hour to reach the Gush Etzion area from Yerushalayim. Traveling on the Kvish Haminharot, officially called Kvish Shishim (Highway 60), you can now reach the Gush in a short 10 minutes. Taking the road near Har Chomah is even quicker.

Another new highway brings residents of Maaleh Adumim and other Jewish towns located near the Jerusalem-Jericho highway, to Jerusalem proper in about seven minutes instead of the previous 15-20 minutes.

These are but two examples of many such roads. It would seem that Hashem is making preparations so that after the Redemption, people will be able to arrive from all over Eretz Yisrael, speedily and with ease, in Yerushalayim and bring korbanos.

Israel’s current road-numbering system is very simple. In contrast to most other countries where odd numbers generally indicate a north–south route, and even numbers mean an east–west route in Israel odd-numbered roads run horizontally, that is, east to west, (e.g., Highway 5 runs from the Mediterranean coast to Shomron). Numbers increase as you head north. And even-numbered roads run vertically, south to north (e.g., Highway 2 runs from Tel Aviv to Haifa), with their numbers increasing as you head east.

The reason that the Israeli road numbering-system differs from that of other lands is that after the formation of the state the government decided to number the roads which until that point had been named for the destinations they lead too and from. It was then realized that if the universal system was used the Tel Aviv-Jerusalem highway, which travels mostly east would be called Road Two. Since it leads to/from Yerushalayim, the capital city and crown of all Eretz Yisrael, this would not have been suitable. So Israel adopted the a different way of numbering then other states in order to honour the Holy City calling this road Highway 1, Kvish Echad.   .

Single- and double-digit roads are national routes, triple-digit roads are regional routes, and four-digit roads are local routes.

Many modern highways in Israel follow ancient trade and spice routes, as well as Biblical byways. This is due to the topographic advantages of the original pathways for travel. Here are just a few examples: Highway 4 (Kvish Arba) runs along Israel’s entire Mediterranean coastal plain and follows, in part, the route of the “Way of the Philistines” or the Derech Hayam (Via Maris — Latin for “route of the sea”). It is an ancient trade route, referred to in Yeshayah 8:23.

Route 443 is the main highway connecting Modiin with Jerusalem and Tel Aviv. In antiquity, the battles of the Maccabees were fought along this road. The episode of “shemesh b’Givon dom” — the stopping of the sun and all the constellations (Yehoshua 10) — took place in this vicinity.

Highway 60 (Kvish Shishim) is an intercity road in Israel, including the West Bank, which stretches from Be’er Sheva, past Chevron and Beit Lechem, and enters Jerusalem. After leaving the city, it goes on to Shechem. It is also known as the “Route of the Patriarchs,” Derech ha’Avot, and figures prominently in the travels of the Avos. Rechov Derech Chevron (part of Highway 60, in Jerusalem) carries thousands of commuters into downtown Jerusalem every day. It is believed to be a section of the road travelled by Avraham and Yitzchak on their way to the Akeidah.

One day, if you’re stuck on Derech Chevron in a traffic jam, you can take your mind off the bumper-to-bumper traffic and honking horns by thinking about that. This could only happen in Israel, where our Biblical past is a living reality.

Monday, December 16, 2013

Jerusalem Vantage Points

Check Out These Jerusalem Vantage Points©

By Vardah Littmann

We are living in wondrous time. Even before the Holocaust, all the gedolim, including the Chofetz Chaim, proclaimed that the times of Ikveisa deMeshicha - the footsteps of Moshiach - had arrived. The last 160 years give us a clear indication that we are nearing the finish line. Beholding the expanding city of  Yerushalayim, which has sprouted up far beyond the Old City walls and now comprises 200 neighborhoods, we see before our eyes the fulfilment of the words of our ancient prophets.

At the time when Zechariah said, "Jerusalem will be settled beyond its walls ... pruztot teshev Yerushalayim … such a phenomenon seemed not even remotely possible.The living conditions of those times and the way war was conducted made the possibility of an unwalled Yerushalayim a complete improbability.

 There were many stations in the long, dark history of Klal Yisrael where it seemed that the words of the prophets could not and would not happen

A Jew who lived at the time when Tzion was plowed  into a field by Adrianus and renamed Colonia Aelia  Capitolina, could not in his wildest dreams imagine that one day, far away in the twentieth and twenty- first centuries, Yerushalayim would spread farther than the five "ring neighborhoods."

To view this miraculous growth and development of the Holy City, lets take a tour to several different vantage points.

Gilo
Established in 1971 in the southwest of the city, Gilo is at one of the highest altitudes in Yerushalayim and provides a spectacular panoramic view. Looking out from the specially built-up observation  point in Rechov Tzvia Yitzchak, you can see Malcha Mall, the Katamonin, and Har Hachoma. Gilo has a population of  40,000 residents and is a well-planned suburb.  Not many years ago, it was constantly in the new. Because the Arabs
living on the nearby hilltop of Beit Jalah kept shooting at it, concrete walls were erected (they were taken down this past year).  Baruch Hashem, it is now "quiet" in Gilo.

Highway Four )Kvish  4)
Anyone travelling on Highway 4 can look down into the valley to witness a nes in our time. Before 1967 these hilltops, that were then on the Jordanian side, were  empty. Now there are new housing projects crowning these hills and an extensive latticework of highways. From the highway, we  can see Ramot, Ramat Shlomo, and Har Hachotzvim.  

Kever of Shmuel Hanavi
From here, you have a fine view of Ramot 6 and  Ramot Daled. On a clear day, you can see the Belz beis medrash, the Gesher HaMeitarim (String Bridge), and
Highway 4. With a 360 degree view from this rooftop post, you can also see from Highway 443 to Kiryat Sefer, with Givat Zev in the background.

The Tayelet) Walkway (in Annon Hanatziv

From the Hass Promenade, both the Old and the New City can be viewed from the south. From here,  Avraham Avinu was shown Har HaMoriah as the site of the akeidah. Crossing the road and standing on the lush rolling lawns on the other side of the walkway, facing north, you can make out the Herodion in the far distance to the left and Kibbutz Ramat Rachel to the right with the neighborhoods of Jewish Talpiot Mizrach.

The Yair Observation Point
From here you have a magnificent view of Yerushalayim from the south as far as Beit Lechem, including Kiryat Hayovel, the Holyland buildings, and the Katamonim.
The lookout point was built by Kibbutz Ramat Rachel  in memory of' one of its members Yair Engel. It features an artificial rockery built around an oak tree.

The Israel Museum
The Gemara tells us of someone who returned from Olam Habah and related the upside-down world he had seen. This idea is expressed in the 16-foot hour glass at the Israel Museum entitled “Turning the World Upside Down, the Upper Jerusalem.” It was created in 2010 by Indian born Jewish sculptor Anish Kapoor. The sculpture reverses and reflects the surrounding landscape and sky, making you feel that you’re floating in the Heavenly Yerushalayim.
 

May Hashem grant that we see very shortly with our own eyes the return of the Shechinah to Tzion when the greatness and kedushah of Yerushalayim will be revealed
to the whole world

The Jerusalem National Park Around the Old City Walls©



Even in faraway Australia, they dream of being in Jerusalem while we have the zechus to be here. In TasmaniaAustralia, 144 km northwest of Hobart, located in the Tasmanian Central Highlands is The Walls of Jerusalem National Park. Forming part of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area, the park takes its name from the geological features in the park which are thought to resemble the walls of the holy city of Jerusalem.

The region is an alpine wilderness dominated by dolerite peaks, highland tarns, and glittering lakes surrounded by alpine vegetation. Many places and features within the park use Biblical references for names, such as Zion Hill, Lake Salome, Mt Jerusalem Solomon’s Jewels, Damascus Gate, the Pool of Bethesda, and King David’s Peak.
Back to Eretz Yisrael and the real thing, no tour in Israel is complete without a visit to Jerusalem's Old City walls. The same walls you can see today around Jerusalem's Old City were built by the Turkish sultan Suleiman the Magnificent during the years 1536-1541. The length of these walls is around 3.8 km.

After the miraculous Six Day War and the reunification of the city, one of the first things they did was to clear away the ramshackle housing leaning against the walls of the Old City. By doing this, they created a greenbelt around them, giving the ancient city a biblical appearance on an open plain.

The green belt preservation had been the suggestion of the American architect Louis Kahn, who advised then Mayor Teddy Kollek to keep the roads around the Old City as far away from the walls as possible. The national park was originally designed to surround the Old City from all sides, to separate between the Old City, and at the same time preventing construction near the walls.

Development of the project included a series of preliminary archeological surveys and excavations. Many of the finds were incorporated into the landscaped walkway, which includes the preserved and sign-posted elements of earlier walls and buildings from all periods of the city's history. The ring of open spaces surrounding the Old City walls includes historic sites, an important urban drainage system, and a variety of natural infrastructure such as orchards, ancient trees, and natural habitats for reptiles, insects, birds, and small mammals.

The area of the national park around the walls of the Old City also includes the gates to the Old City of Jerusalem: Shaar Yaffo, HaShaar HaChadash (New Gate), Shaar Shechem, Shaar HaPrachim, Shaar HaArayot, Shaar HaRachamim, Shaar HaAshpot and Shaar Tzion (Zion Gate).



Approaching the Old City from Jaffa Road, the park has an entrance on each of the three streets which encircle it. This section of the park contains a modern mosaic map of Jerusalem and a board displaying photographs and statistics relative to the different communities in Jerusalem from 1840 to 1977.

Rechov Hanevi’im 9©


The Renaissance-style building on 29 Rechov Shivtei Yisrael, corner of 34 Rechov Haneviim, was built between 1911 and 1917. It started out as the Italian Hospital of the Mission, and was managed by nuns. During World War I, because Italy was an enemy of Turkey, the Turks seized the building.

The British took over the building during Mandatory times and used the Italian Hospital during World War I to headquarter the British Royal Air Force. Three years later, when the British began leaving Palestine, both the Arabs and the Hagana tried to grab this strategic property near the border with eastern Jerusalem. Fortunately, the Hagana discovered the exact time of the British pull-out and the Jews were able to take over the building.

During the War of Independence it was a frontal Israeli firing post, facing the Jordanian Legion.
Following the war, the building functioned as a home for the mentally deficient. The Ministry of
Education occupied it in 1963. On the door of the former chapel of the Italian Hospital is an enormous mezuzah to show that the structure is now a Jewish building.

Machanayim

On the corner of Haneviim and Shivtei Yisrael streets diagonally opposite the Italian Hospital stands an arresting edifice that dates back to 1885. The building was constructed by a Swiss Protestant missionary named Jacob Johannes Frutiger. He called it Machanayim and engraved the name above the door. The name comes from a passsuk in Bereishis (32:3): Yaakov said when he saw them, This is a G-dly camp! So he called the name of that place Machanayim.

Atop the roof is a high balcony that offered its residents and guests a splendid view of the Old City. Frutiger became one of the richest bankers in Eretz Yisrael, but when he started to suffer from forgetfulness (possibly Alzheimers), his son took over the bank. However, his son was soon arrested for not carrying a lantern at night. This Turkish law assumed that anyone without a light was bent on disreputable purposes.

His imprisonment did little to repair the standing of the bank, whose reputation was ruined, and as a result the family had to sell the house. Menachem Ussishkin, director of the Jewish National Fund, bought it and lived there from 1922 until 1927. Eventually, Lord Herbert Plumertook, the
British High Commissioner, took over the gorgeous domicile. Ussishkin was so upset that when he built ahouse in Rehavia, he emblazoned Machanayim above the door!
 
At a later date the original Machanayim house became the Evelina de Rothschild School. Today it houses offices of the Israeli Ministry of Education.

At 26 Rechov Haneviim there is a private balcony from where (at a certain angle) the makom Hamikdash can be seen.

In front of the new apartment block at 26-aleph Rechov Haneviim is a small memorial garden with a few benches. It is dedicated to Daniel Bitton, a 42-yearold bus driver who was killed, together with 25 other Jews, in a suicide bombing on a No. 18 bus travelling down Jaffa Road near the Jerusalem Central Bus Station, on Feb. 25, 1996. A few days later, on March 3, 1996, an additional 19 people were murdered by a suicide bomber on another 18 bus.

The U.S. Consulate General, founded in the Old City in 1844, relocated to an address near the beginning of Rechov Haneviim in the late 19th century. In 1912, it moved to its present address on Agron Street.

Overlooking the busy Kvish Chail Handasah (Highway 1), at the corner of Haneviim Street, is Mitzpe Tomer. The lookouts name commemorates a 19-yearold Israeli border police officer, Mordechai Tomer, who was killed when a traveling car bomb detonated in April 2002.

Directly ahead, looking out from Mitzpe Tomer, is the site where Kiryah Neemanah (Batei Nissan Beck) was founded in 1879. Chassidim purchased this area in order to build the ninth colony founded beyond the Old City walls. Thirty houses were built by the chassidim, and the other half of was built up by Persian Jews. Other neighbourhoods for Syrian Jews and Jews who came from Georgia were built in the area. In all, there were 200 homes.

During the 1929 Arab riots, the Kiryah Neemanah area was subjected to terrible Muslim fury. The residents were murdered and plundered by the Arabs. Three of the eight shuls of the area were vandalized and then set on fire. After the riots, only a handful of Jews returned, and Muslims and Christians occupied the rest of the homes. These Jews also suffered from Arab terror in the 1936 Arab riots. In 1948, the last of the Jews in the neighbourhood left the area, escaping before the Arab forces occupied eastern Jerusalem and the Old City. Today a few brave families have come to live in the area among the Arabs.

From 1948 until 1967, the eastern end of Rechov Haneviim, which forms a triangle with the Old City walls and the southern side of the neighbourhood of Musrara, was part of the no-mans-land between Israel and Jordan. The area was returned to Israel with the reunification of Jerusalem after the miraculous Six Day War.


In the late 1980s, it was proposed to widen the narrow, two-lane Rechov Haneviim into a 32-meter-wide superhighway. This would have entailed the destruction of historic garden-courtyard buildings lining the street, and the plan encountered stiff opposition from Jerusalem residents. An alternative proposal suggested laying the highway across the courtyards while retaining the outer stone walls, to maintain the 19th century character of the street. Neither idea has come to fruition.